Month: September 2017

Summer Vegetable Lasagna

Summer Vegetable Lasagna

A few weeks ago some friends came over to do our fantasy football draft. It was starting to get cool out and I wanted something that could feed a lot of people easily: lasagna was calling my name. However, I wanted something light and vegetarian, […]

CSA Unboxing: Week 5

CSA Unboxing: Week 5

This week’s box further proves that Fall is upon us. However, Chicago weather has decided to give us a September heat wave so it is too hot to roast or anything or really cook for that matter! Luckily, fall produce all means produce that keeps […]

Kohlrabi and Apple Slaw

Kohlrabi and Apple Slaw

Labor day weekend we went to a friend’s house on Lake Michigan. Our host planned to grill dinner and asked everyone else to bring a side dish. I immediately knew I wanted to bring slaw using the kohlrabi from our CSA.

Kohlrabi is a very weird cousin of cabbage. It has sort of cabbage layers on the outside of the bulb but the inside is solid, like a turnip. The inside tastes like a mild turnip or radish with a hint of sweet. You can use it in stir-fry, roasted, in fritters, or pureed into soup. However, my favorite way to eat kohlrabi is raw. It’s hearty texture and mild flavor makes it perfect for slaws and salads!

Crazy looking kohlrabi.

In making my slaw, I was inspired by this kohlrabi and apple salad I found on Epicurious. The version on Epicurious is for a beautiful refined salad that looks suitable for a multi-course dinner. To make it more suitable for a cookout, I cut my vegetables into matchsticks and left out the nuts. I also felt it needed more lemon juice.

The mild kohlrabi is complimented by the addition of tart apple in this recipe. The dressing of lemon and white wine vinegar ties the flavors together and adds a nice zing. The slaw is topped with mint leaves and Parmesan cheese. I have to say, all of us were skeptical about adding the cheese but were very pleasantly surprised when we did. It added a nice earthiness and additional saltiness that we didn’t know we were missing until we took the leap.

The hardest part of the recipe is chopping the kohlrabi and apples. After that, it is smooth sailing! I chopped my vegetables and dressed them the night before before we headed to the cookout. The vegetables stayed crisp even though they were dressed 24 hours before eating. When it was time to eat, I topped it with the cheese. I added the mint when dressing the salad but it turned kind of limp so I would suggest waiting to add the mint until you are ready to eat if you are making it ahead of time.

The first step to preparing kohlrabi for just about any dish is to peal it. Remove the green tops, you can treat these like collard greens or kale, and use a vegetable peeler to remove the hard outer layer. Look at how less scary the kohlrabi looks once it is peeled.

Peeled kohlrabi.

Next, chop the kohlrabi into matchsticks. The bottoms of the kohlrabi are whiter and much harder than the rest, so I stopped chopping once I hit that part and discarded the hard base.

Then we chop the apple. I left the peel on the apple so that it would add color to the dish. The sticks were small enough that no one seemed to mind the peel!

Now, we make a simple dressing of lemon zest, lemon juice, and white wine vinegar. Toss the kohlrabi and apple mixture in the dressing and top with mint and cheese when ready to serve. Such an easy and refreshing salad for late summer!

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Kohlrabi and Apple Slaw

Kohlrabi and apple is a classic pair for good reason. The tart apple is a nice compliment to the mild taste of the kohlrabi. This slaw served 10 people as a side dish easily. Inspired by Bon Appetit via Epicurious.

Prep Time 20 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes
Servings 10 people
Author thebraveradish

Ingredients

  • 1 bunch of Kohlrabi
  • 1 tart Apple like Pink Lady
  • ½ tsp Lemon Zest chopped
  • 2 tbls Lemon Juice
  • 1 tbls White Wine vVnegar
  • Salt to taste
  • ½ cup Mint leaves chopped
  • ¼ cup good Parmesan cheese

Instructions

  1. Peel the kohlrabi by slicing off the green tops, you can save these for another use, and peeling the bulbs with a vegetable peeler. Chop bulbs into matchsticks. Core and chop the apple into similarly sized matchsticks. Add both to large bowl.

  2. Mix the lemon zest, lemon juice, and vinegar in a small bowl. I usually grate my lemons on a cheese grater to zest them, and then chop the shavings finer.
  3. Toss the kohlrabi and apple with the dressing. Season to taste with salt.
  4. You can do up to this point and refrigerate up to 12 hours before serving. When ready to serve, toss with mint leaves and Parmesan cheese.

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Mexican Loaded Corn Cakes

Mexican Loaded Corn Cakes

As you have seen, we are reciving a lot of corn in our CSA boxes this summer. I started looking for ways to use corn and became infatuated with the idea of corn cakes when I realized this was an opportunity to recreate one of […]

CSA Unboxing: Week 4

CSA Unboxing: Week 4

It definitely feels like we have transitioned to fall here in Chicago. The weather has been hovering around 65 degrees and it is getting dark earlier and earlier. It’s almost like the seasons decided summer was over on August 31 on the dot. The sun […]

Refrigerator Pickles

Refrigerator Pickles

Like most picky eaters, when I was a child I frequently decided I didn’t like things without actually trying them. Pickles were one of these foods. The vinegar smell turned me off and I didn’t see anything to gain by eating that weird smelly cucumber on the plate when I could just pass it off to a family member. I also loved cucumbers as a child, so I am sure part of the thinking was why did you ruin my perfectly cucumber?

Well fast forward 20 years and we received four huge cucumbers in our CSA box. I couldn’t deny the fact that pickles were an obvious choice for using and preserving them. I have had some pickles as an adult that I didn’t hate, often at restaurants where they were homemade.

I opted for refrigerator pickles because a. I think the vinegar flavor is a little milder than canned pickles since they don’t require as much vinegar for preservation purposes.; and b. I don’t want to mess with boiling cans and hoping I won’t give myself salmonella.

I waited to post this recipe until we were able to taste the final product to be sure they were good! I actually really liked them! I made sure to flavor the pickles with some of my favorite things: garlic, red pepper flakes, and peppercorns. In addition, you can’t have pickles with some sprigs of dill, mustard, and coriander seeds.

We have already polished off one jar, they are so delicious! I was impressed how crisp the pickles stayed even though I didn’t use pickling cucumbers. The pickled garlic cloves are a great treat when you get to the bottom too!

First we fill mason jars with mustard seeds, coriander seeds, peppercorns, red pepper flakes, and sprigs of dill.

Jars are filled with the spices and dill.

Water and vinegar are simmered with cloves of garlic and salt. The garlic is removed and placed in jars, jars packed with cucumbers, and brine poured into the jars.

Jars are filled with cucumber spears and brine. The cucumbers float but will push down once the lids are put on.

Lids are screwed on and jars are refrigerated for two weeks. After two weeks you can open them up and start using them!

 

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Refrigerator Pickles

These pickles are packed with flavor from a mix of garlic, mustard, coriander, peppercorns, dill, and red pepper flakes. They are a bit spicier than I expected, so reduce the red pepper flakes or leave them out all together if you don’t like spice.
Prep Time 15 minutes
Author thebraveradish

Ingredients

  • 3 8 oz mason jars
  • 9 cloves garlic
  • 2 large cucumbers
  • 3/4 tsp mustard seeds
  • 3/4 tsp coriander seeds
  • 3/4 tsp black peppercorns
  • 6 sprigs fresh dill
  • 3/8 tsp crushed red pepper flakes optional
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 3 tbls white vinegar
  • 1 1/2 tbls kosher salt

Instructions

  1. First, prepare your jars. Place ¼ tsp each of mustard seed, coriander seed and black peppercorns, 2 sprigs of dill, and 1/8 tsp red pepper flakes (if using) into each jar.
  2. Cut the cucumbers into spears. I think mine were cut into eights width-wise and roughly thirds lengthwise. Be sure to test the height if the cucumbers in the jar to ensure the lids will close.

  3. Bring 1 1/2 cups of water to a simmer. Once simmering, add the garlic cloves and simmer for 5 minutes. Add the vinegar and salt and bring the pot to a boil. Cook until the salt dissolves. Turn off heat.

  4. Using tongs or a spoon, remove the garlic from the pot and place 3 cloves into the bottom of each jar. Pack the jars with the sticks of cucumber; you want them to be tightly packed. Then, pour the brine over the cucumbers and fill to the top. Screw on the tops and refrigerate. After 2 weeks they will be ready to eat!

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